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24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Close your eyes, clear your heart, let it go... with 341 notes

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Source: tabooz.tk

24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from explodingdog with 326 notes

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24th April 2014

Audio post reblogged from Let the music be your master. with 5 notes - Played 8 times

Cyndi Lauper - “Time After Time”

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24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Danfrth is on Tumblr with 6,680 notes


Women’s Forestry Corps, UK 1918.

Women’s Forestry Corps, UK 1918.

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Source: the-seed-of-europe

24th April 2014

Video

Excerpt: George Plimptom at the Helm of The Paris Review

[Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton as Himself premieres nationally Friday, May 16, 9-10:30 p.m. on PBS] 

Tagged: American Masters

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24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Tastefully Offensive GIFs with 28,282 notes

4gifs:

Hockey player makes kid’s day. [video]

4gifs:

Hockey player makes kid’s day. [video]

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Source: ForGIFs.com

24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Christine Friar with 169 notes

christinefriar:

These Genius Dolphins Are Using Sea Sponges As Tools

The first thing to know is that dolphins can be divided into two groups, and those groups are ”spongers” and ”non-spongers.” The non-spongers are the dolphins that are probably the ones you think about when you have occasion to think about dolphins: smooth, sleek, nimbly darting through the water. 
But the spongers! The spongers are slightly less physically nimble, but possibly much more intellectually nimble, than their fellow cetaceans. And that’s because, as they swim, they carry sea sponges in their beaks—an activity that may help to protect their sensitive snouts from sharp rocks, stingrays, urchins, and other things that might plague them, particularly as they forage for food along the seafloor. Dolphin sponging is a recent discovery: In 1997, scientists observed a group of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins engaging in the practice in Shark Bay, off the coast of Australia.
The behavior, Justin Gregg notes in his book Are Dolphins Really Smart?, has since been traced back to approximately 180 years ago, to a single female who has been nicknamed “Sponging Eve.” Scientists now believe that more than 60 percent of all female dolphins in the area practice sponging. And while the behavior seems to be transmitted for the most part along mother-daughter lines, as many as half of the males born to “spongers” in the area grow up to become spongers, too.
Read more. [Image: Hugh Pearson/Naturepl.com]

christinefriar:

These Genius Dolphins Are Using Sea Sponges As Tools

The first thing to know is that dolphins can be divided into two groups, and those groups are ”spongers” and ”non-spongers.” The non-spongers are the dolphins that are probably the ones you think about when you have occasion to think about dolphins: smooth, sleek, nimbly darting through the water. 

But the spongers! The spongers are slightly less physically nimble, but possibly much more intellectually nimble, than their fellow cetaceans. And that’s because, as they swim, they carry sea sponges in their beaks—an activity that may help to protect their sensitive snouts from sharp rocks, stingrays, urchins, and other things that might plague them, particularly as they forage for food along the seafloor. Dolphin sponging is a recent discovery: In 1997, scientists observed a group of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins engaging in the practice in Shark Bay, off the coast of Australia.

The behavior, Justin Gregg notes in his book Are Dolphins Really Smart?, has since been traced back to approximately 180 years ago, to a single female who has been nicknamed “Sponging Eve.” Scientists now believe that more than 60 percent of all female dolphins in the area practice sponging. And while the behavior seems to be transmitted for the most part along mother-daughter lines, as many as half of the males born to “spongers” in the area grow up to become spongers, too.

Read more. [Image: Hugh Pearson/Naturepl.com]

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Source: The Atlantic

24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Condé Nast Traveler with 272 notes

condenasttraveler:

The Rosewood, housed in a stately Edwardian edifice near Covent Garden that was once the offices of an insurance company, elegantly splits the difference between the two London hotel mainstays: the quirky and the stuffy.

condenasttraveler:

The Rosewood, housed in a stately Edwardian edifice near Covent Garden that was once the offices of an insurance company, elegantly splits the difference between the two London hotel mainstays: the quirky and the stuffy.

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24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 178 notes


Raquel Welch

Raquel Welch

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Source: wasabassco

24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from this isn't happiness. with 1,287 notes

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